Laundry instructions for ATG gloves

Gloves from ATG (proRange and classicRange) can be washed safely in the following way:

  1. Use commercial laundry soap or detergent (do NOT use dry cleaning solutions!)
  2. Wash in warm to medium hot water, do not exceed 104°F (40° C)
  3. Wash for 10 minutes
  4. Rinse in cold water.
  5. Repeat wash and rinse if soiling is especially heavy
  6. Rinse in cold water
  7. Tumble dry – maximum temperature 140°F (60° C)

When laundering gloves that have especially heavy dirt or grease, include several pieces of heavy canvas in the second wash cycle – friction from the canvas against the gloves helps loosen and remove deep dirt.

Important note
During the use of gloves and the laundering process glove performance can and will deteriorate. For critical areas requiring cut and heat resistance tests need too conducted after use and laundering to ensure that the performance criteria still meet the needs of those using the glove. ATG can accept no liability once gloves have been washed.

Should you need further information please contact one of our sales partners which can be found on our website.

Is a new pair of gloves always clean?

It’s probably something that you never thought about before, right? It’s certainly a conversation stopper at parties, but something very serious on a professional level. Gloves come out of the packet, so they have to be clean. No one has ever used them before, so if I use a new pair of gloves every time they must be ok, mustn’t they? Don’t take this for granted as a lot of the gloves today contain residual chemicals left in the glove from the production process.

The cleanliness issue

The problem is quite widespread – so say studies by the Institute of Occupational Medicine (BGFA) at the Ruhr University in Bochum (Germany), and the Danish Technological Institute for the Environment. The BGFA found that 45% of the leather gloves tested positive to Chromium (VI) impurities, despite the fact that most modern tanning agents are free from large amounts of Chromium (VI). Likewise, the Danish Technological Institute for the Environment found 35% of the leather gloves tested contained Chromium (VI) in levels above the acceptable parts per million (PPM) guides for harmful ingredients. If I stop using leather gloves and only use synthetic gloves will everything be OK? The simple and direct answer to that is NO. You always need to check any glove you’re using, even if it is from one of the large, well known manufacturers. Extra attention should be given if you are evaluating polyurethane (PU) gloves, to make sure the parts per million of DMF and THF are respected. So what should I look for?

Suitable gloves

There are three important elements to be considered when choosing suitable gloves relating to the way they are produced, how clean they are when they come out of the packet and the dermatological aspect for continual use.

Production processes

REACH® is the European Union has adopted a regulation in the spirit of protecting human health and the environment from the risks that can be posed by chemicals. Ask your current supplier about the companies obligations towards this regulation to see what they have done and if you currently use ATG® gloves rest assured there are no Substances of Very High Concern (SVHC) in any of our gloves.

Out of the packet cleanliness

Oeko-Tex® is the international testing and certification system for textiles, limiting the use of certain chemicals. It has become established as a safety standard throughout the textile manufacturing chain and enables checks to be made for any harmful substances at each stage in the production process. This Oeko-Tex® label is a good indicator of product cleanliness as it comes out of the packet.

Dermatological aspect

As professional work gloves are going to be on the skin for long periods of time, day in, day out, the dermatological aspect has to be taken into consideration. Think of it another way. Why would you pay for something to go on your hand that is going to damage your health? Unfortunately this is the case for many gloves users today, but it doesn’t have to be you or your workforce. It’s essential to check if the gloves are dermatologically accredited – and don’t fall into the trap of thinking that the more expensive they are, or the larger the company they come from, the cleaner they will be.

How can ATG® help?

You can choose from our focused range with the confidence that ALL our gloves are Dermatologically Accredited. Additionally, they are manufactured in our own factories in accordance with the REACH® European Community Regulation on chemicals (EC 1907/2006), and are yearly tested and in accordance with the Oeko-Tex® 100 standard. We are also ISO 9001 certified and ISO 14001 accreditation.

Making the perfect glove is like building a car?

How can making gloves be compared to building cars? Well think of it another way. Would you buy a car with a huge engine without ensuring the chassis, brakes, transmission, gearbox and suspension could cope with the power. It’s all about balance and developing gloves is no different. Comfort and durability have to go together if people are to wear the gloves and companies to buy them. So how do you make a comfortable light weight glove? There are 3 main areas to be considered with the most comfortable gloves blending them all together to form the basis of a balanced approach.

Heat management

This is a key element in delivering comfort. Not the way the glove protects from heat rather how it deals with the heat build-up within the glove and transfers it outside. MaxiFlex® from ATG is able to do this through a patented process that creates a network of tunnels that enables heat from the hand to be channeled outside the glove allowing the hand to breathe on the front and back delivering 360° breathability and consequently superior comfort. If you want to try it for yourself then put a MaxiFlex® on your hand, place the coating on the palm of the glove against your mouth and blow. What you’ll feel if a warm flow of air inside the glove that demonstrates the breathability. In a working situation the heat from the hand passes from the inside to the outside of the glove maximizing breathability and comfort.

Longevity

Generally the longer something lasts the better value for money it is and gloves are no different. There are two ways to achieve this. Firstly by making it more abrasion resistance so that it withstands the challenges of the work done and secondly the ability to launder and re-use the glove again. By combining these within the same glove will significantly reduce the glove budget however it has to be balanced to ensure that the dexterity and flexibility aren’t compromised.

Dexterity and flexibility

With fit comes dexterity so finding a glove in the size that fits you perfectly is essential. Given we are getting bigger and there are more women in the workforce it’s not enough to offer just 4 sizes. They have to range from size 5 (XXS) to size 12 (XXXL). The fit should also not to be too tight as to restrict flexibility and when comparing two or more similar gloves then you should also check on the palm thickness as this can also assist in increasing flexibility.

If you’re looking for the glove that can reduce your gloves budget whilst increasing worker comfort and satisfaction then MaxiFlex® is the glove for you.

 

What would you say if someone asked you to drink engineering oil?

The response for most sane people would of course be “NO” yet hundreds of thousands of us do it each day without realising. How? By wearing inappropriate gloves when working with engineering oils or coolants. But why do they do it?

Contributing Factors

There are three contributing factors with the first being the behavior of people working with oils who prioritize comfort and grip over oil protection. Why? In a survey conducted on this subject 88% of people polled didn’t realize that oil posed a danger to their health. This lack of understanding explains why so many workers today choose to use unsuitable light weight assembly gloves. It shocks many when they are made aware that this exposure to mineral oil has a 30% increased risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis in later life. That’s the conclusion of an extensive study conducted in Sweden between the Rheumatology unit of the Karolinska hospital (Stockholm), the Institute of

Environmental Medicine, the Department of Occupational Medicine and the Stockholm Center for Public Health. Today rheumatoid arthritis is the main cause of disability among people over fifty-five years of age in industrialized countries. It’s an irreversible disease that affects the musculoskeletal system and specifically the joints.

How does oil get into your body?

It gets into your body through the skin. Whilst your skin can repel water it soaks up oils through the external part of the epidermis known as the keratin layer. The keratin layer contains fat and fat like substances that readily absorbs chemicals such as oils and coolants.

Time for change?

We at ATG® certainly think it’s time for a change which is why we have developed a revolutionary new glove that’s oil repellent, yet super thin, flexible, dexterous and comfortable which we call MaxiDry®.

MaxiDry® 

Think of MaxiDry® as an oil repellent MaxiFlex®. That’s how the development of this product started life because we know that the majority of people using general purpose gloves are working in an oily environment. Our showcase product in the range is the MaxiDry® 56-426 which is thinner than nearly all standard foam nitrile general purpose gloves but with the advantage of a liquid repellent layer built-in which resists oil (60cP) for >480 minutes (8 hours).

Isn’t it time you did the right thing and get the proper glove for the job?

Is grip the new safety feature?

This will, perhaps, be the world’s shortest article, since the answer to that question is yes: grip is indeed the new safety feature. But why is grip able to offer the glove user more safety? Surely gloves have always had grip, so how can this be a new thing? The answer to these questions is to do with the type of grip, the way it’s delivered and the additional benefits it brings. As any tyre manufacture will tell you, power is nothing without grip. Grip has to be optimized for the surface condition of the road or track and gloves are no different.

Cut resistance

Often the response to recurring cut injuries is to introduce gloves with higher levels of cut resistance. However, increasing the cut resistance often treats the effect, i.e. cuts, rather than the cause of the issue, i.e. movement. After all, it’s the movement of what the hand is holding that frequently cuts the glove. Simply put, if it doesn’t slip then it cannot cut. Used correctly, a glove with ANSI cut level 2 / EN level 3 with the right grip can be as effective if not more effective than a glove with ANSI cut level 4 / EN level 5. Using thinner gloves will also increase worker acceptance through better comfort.

Worker comfort

Worker comfort is always one of the first things people consider when selecting or trying on a glove. Is it comfortable? Does it offer the needed dexterity, flexibility and tactility? Gloves that offer more cut resistance are frequently more bulky, working against the other metrics. It’s a question of protection versus comfort. It’s fundamental to get this right, since bulky gloves will be taken off for precision-handling tasks leaving bare hands exposed to the risk of a cut. This is why many case studies conclude that using gloves with a higher cut resistance will not necessarily reduce the injury frequency rate (IFR).

Hand fatigue

Have you ever clenched your fist 100 times? If you have, then you’ll know that at the outset it’s easy but towards the end it becomes more difficult. This fatigue is similar to when your hand lifts and holds something over and over again. Why? Because it has to apply force and force needs energy. It’s no different for workers using their hands professionally. With glove grip enhanced by just 5%, the dry lift increases from 24kg (bare hand) to 25.26kg (gloved hand). At ATG®, we like to think of it another way. Rather than being able to lift an extra 1.26kg with an optimized grip, we say that only 2.38kg of force is required to lift 1kg instead of 2.5kg, and these small differences over a working day, week, month and year(s) can make a significant difference.

Time for change?

We at ATG® believe so. People have been poorly served and come to accept that coated cut-resistant gloves are PU. All solid film PU gloves don’t breathe, don’t fit, don’t last and often contain harmful chemicals. We were inspired to develop something totally new within the cut sector based on the core values of MaxiFlex®, creating the world’s first game-changing biomimetic cut-resistant glove, MaxiFlex® Cut™.

 

How clean are your working gloves?

It may be something that you’ve never thought of however we at ATG® believe that it is the right for all glove wearers to know that the gloves they wear are “dermatologically safe” and the science and research behind them is robust.

In our on-going discussions with end-users it’s commonly thought that taking a fresh glove from the packet means that the gloves are clean. Don’t take this for granted as a lot of the gloves today contain residual chemicals left in the glove from the production process.

Cleanliness issue

The problem is quite widespread – so say studies by the Institute of Occupational Medicine (BGFA) at the Ruhr University in Bochum (Germany), and the Danish Technological Institute for the Environment. The BGFA found that 45% of the leather gloves tested positive to Chromium (VI) impurities, despite the fact that most modern tanning agents are free from large amounts of Chromium (VI). Likewise, the Danish Technological Institute for the Environment found 35% of the leather gloves tested contained Chromium (VI) in levels above the acceptable parts per million (PPM) guides for harmful ingredients.

If you stop using leather gloves and only use synthetic gloves will everything be OK? The simple and direct answer to that is NO. You always need to check any glove you use, even if it is from one of the large, well known manufacturers as synthetic gloves could also contain harmful ingredients. So what should you look for?

Suitable gloves

There are three important elements to be considered when choosing suitable gloves relating to the way they are produced, how clean they are when they come out of the packet and the dermatological aspect for continual use.

1. Production process:

REACH is a regulation of the European Union, adopted to improve the protection of human health and the environment from the risks that can be posed by chemicals. Ask your current supplier about the companies obligations towards this regulation to see what they have done and if you currently use ATG® gloves rest assured there are no Substances of Very High Concern (SVHC) in any of our gloves.

2. Out of the packet cleanliness:

Oeko-Tex® is the international testing and certification system for textiles, limiting the use of certain chemicals. It has become established as a safety standard throughout the textile manufacturing chain and enables checks to be made for any harmful substances at each stage in the production process. This Oeko-Tex® label is a good indicator of product cleanliness as it comes out of the packet.

3. Dermatological aspect:

As professional work gloves are going to rest against the skin for long periods of time on a daily basis, the dermatological aspect, we at ATG® believe, has to be taken into consideration. It’s essential to check if the gloves are dermatologically accredited – and don’t fall into the trap of thinking that the more expensive they are, or the larger the company they come from, the cleaner they will be.

Time for change

We at ATG® think so, which is why we’ve developed the HandCare™ program that’s integrated into every ATG® glove. All our gloves are dermatologically accredited by the Skin Health Alliance. More information.

ATG refurbishes the Base Hospital

The Base Hospital in Wathupitawela is located within close proximity to our knitting factory, which is approximately 40 km from the city. This hospital was established in 1910 and caters to many villages around the vicinity. Our team selected some of the wards which required to be refurbished and dedicated their time to see this being a success.

Ward n° 1, which is the maternity ward, caters to 42 beds. The ward was given a facelift and the floor was tiled giving a better ambience to the mothers just about to give birth. In addition other needs required for the ward were provided to welcome the new born into the world.

In 1948 ward n° 7 was built and is allocated as a general ward for males. Daily admissions, accidents and other general admissions are treated here. The ward and the toilets were in a dilapidated state and were refurbished giving a great uplift. Further step taken by ATG is to take responsibility of maintaining the ward which caters to 31 beds as an ongoing community service project.  The maintenance is done on an annual basis and as required by our team in order to keep the ward up to standard as this is the hospital’s most visited ward where many patients are being treated.

In addition the OPD consultation rooms and the blood bank were uplifted with the required facilities to comfort the patient, giving the comfort of a Maxiflex.

How to find the glove you need

7 out of 10 people use the wrong glove

It can be exceedingly confusing to search for the right type of glove on the internet, by reviewing catalogues or visiting exhibitions. Globally there are 11 key glove suppliers who collectively offer just over 3.000 gloves. To look at it another way: that’s 272 gloves per manufacturer. It’s arguably too many gloves. These product ranges have been developed more from tactical battles between manufacturers instead of developing product ranges around customer needs. Simply put, if one manufacturer develops and launches a product the other manufacturers follow suit with a similar product. In addition, each country will also have local manufacturers and numerous distributors in addition to the 11 key suppliers.

And let’s add some more facts. Under the EU directive 89/686/EEC each and every glove has to, as a minimum, satisfy EN420 requirements before being tested to EN 388. Once tested for abrasion, cut, tear and puncture these test results have to be published. Four test results on 3000 gloves makes 12,000 data points. Easily within a country there will be 20,000 data points from test results that need to be considered. There are of course other tests for heat (EN407), chemical (EN374), cold (EN511) and protection from ionising radiation and radioactive contamination (EN421), which will add to the 20.000 data points.

Three thousand gloves plus local manufacturers/suppliers, 20.000 data points from EN test results and when defining the need thousands of possible combinations. Is it reasonable to ask safety officers to have expert knowledge on thousands of products?

What are a customer’s needs?

  • Comfort
  • Grip
  • Mechanical protection
  • Heat protection
  • Resistance to chemical and liquids.

Of the five general areas that a safety officer has to consider three are well covered by the 89/686/EEC directive: mechanical and heat protection along with resistance to chemical and liquids. There are two key areas missing relating to grip and the most critical selection criteria, comfort.

How to choose and introduce a new glove?

There are six straight-forward steps:

  1. What are the the hazard(s) at the workstation/application?
  2. What is the level of risk associated with the hazard? Experienced workers are more informed and adapted to the risk versus new or temporary staff.
  3. What are possible alternatives available in the market?
  4. Can we test them on comfort, grip, mechanical protection, heat protection and resistance to chemicals and liquids? Test the potential gloves to ensure they satisfy worker, safety and quality requirements.
  5. Is everyone on board? Ensure everyone understands the need for change and buys in. Buy-in with an ok glove can be better than no commitment with the ideal glove.
  6. Who will monitor the change process to new gloves? Implement and manage the change process making corrective actions if needed.

Who has a say in the decision?

  • Purchasing will view this as an opportunity to look at rationalizing the number of suppliers and references. They need to be guided to focus on the overall yearly spend versus unit price and sometimes educated as to why they need to buy more expensive items.
  • Quality managers will need reassurance that the new gloves will not create quality problems. It has happened that new gloves leave traces on, for example, car panels which doesn’t allow paint to be applied without blemishes. Additional costs are incurred to take the car off line to be prepped and repainted. It could be avoided by ensuring gloves are silicone-free.
  • Production is always looking to run the production lines at an optimal speed. The more forward thinking companies invest in gloves with high levels of dexterity so workers can work quicker and the lines run faster.

What seemed simple is starting to look complex. On one side there are needs and the on the other side a lot of products. Matching gloves to the need requires extensive research.

ATG’s Rubber Plantation Project

With the view of enabling sustenance to the civilians and elders affected due to the war in Sri Lanka, ATG sponsored a Rubber Plantation Project in Vavuniya, a village in the North Part of the Country. This project was lead by Mr Damitha Abeykoon & Mr Ranjan Dilantha to its success.

The families were direct victims of the war who require an income to sustain and provide for their families. Some of them were in permanent disability whilst others have suffered the terrible loss of family members.

As a initial step 2500 hybrid rubber plants were presented to 50 families along with fertilizers sufficient for a period of a year. Since rubber plantation’s have been one of the main exports of Sri Lanka, these families are able to foresee a livelihood within a short period of time by extracting latex from these rubber trees and generate a permanent income for them.

Bas in Dakar III: from Iquique to Buenos Aires

Tuesday, January 13th
Iquique – Calama
538 km

Bas really could not enjoy this stage of the race: there were cobblestones, fesh fesh, and cars that sped up to overtake the motorcyclists. Dangerous, and surely unpleasant. Luckily there were fans alongside the route; sometimes they were surprisingly local citizens who support the BAS-team whole-heartedly.

Wednesday, January 14th
Calama – Salta
891 km

Back to Argentina and over the Andes. Around half of all motorcycle racers disappeared, but the BAS team is stronger than what the statistics indicate: only one of the five fell out. A late start meant that the BAS-team ended up between the cars today. This caused one of the team members to have problems with the injector, and more snow is yet to come to the mountains. There were more than 5 hours of delay because of technical problems (actually 3 broken injectors). Only just after midnight, after a ride of more than 11 hours, and in terrible weather, they arrived at camp with no technical help and no truck. So it was a night of sleeping on the floor and gritting their teeth.

Thursday, January 15th
Salta – Termas Rio Hondo
547 km

Finally, an easier trip. No technical problems, but an hour of rain, and the more they descended, the warmer it got. Above all, Bas felt he was given lots of heart-warming support and encouragement from the Argentinians who were standing along the side. This day ended with an early arrival; there was still daylight this time. Bas was already at camp by 8pm.

Friday, January 16th
Termas Rio Hondo – Rosario
1024 km

The first part of this stage was technically challenging: narrower paths, rivers crossings, … but it was also a pretty quiet road. Nothing to see along the way, except a pig and a turtle. And for once, very few cars tried to pass us. After all the hardships from the last weeks, the organizer gave the remaining participants a surprise: for the last boring 500 kilometers (a terribly long, straight stretch), the motorcycles could stay in the truck and the racers could be brought to the finish that way. Everyone is looking forward to the end of the race now.

Saturday, January 17th
Rosario – Buenos Aires
388 km

Everyone left in a delightful mood for this last stretch. The route was muddy because of the rain (and because hundreds of vehicles rode over it during the first stage, but then in the other direction). Traditionally, the starting order is reversed in this last stage: the lower ones from the ranking first, the fastest last. In this 13th stage, things still went wrong for Bas. Bas’s rear wheel suddenly broke in a water puddle. He fell hard, luckily without any other consequence. Progress was slow because of the bad weather, and also with a difficult-to-handle steering wheel. The organizer had to change a route again, and the tour (in which all rally racers want to speed up, of course) was more dangerous because of the harsh weather. Finally, Bas got his medal on stage. “In the past days, I have often thought that I would never do this again. But don’t be surprised if you find me standing here again next year.”